Thursday, 23 September 2021

Julies Name Game - New Free Motion Quilting Design #237

Sets of three Autumn leaves form a new quilting design
New Free Motion Quilting Design #237

Celebrating the arrival of Fall here is this weeks new Free Motion Quilting design.

What do you think it’s name should be?

Comment below to suggest a name or vote for your favorite.

The winner will be chosen by popular vote (here and on Facebook / Instagram )at 6:00 PM (Pacific) on Sunday Sept 26, 2021.

The thread used for this sample is WonderFil Tutti 50 weight cotton TU06 “Sunflower”.

Julies Name Game - New Free Motion Quilting Design #236


Autumn inspired quilting design of berries and leaves
New Free Motion Quilting Design #236

 From a doodle to a stitch, here is my new Free Motion Quilting design #236.

Named by popular vote (Facebook / Instagram) at 6:00 PM (Pacific) on Sunday Sept 19th 2021, this design is now called “Winterberry”.

Thank you and congratulations to Brenda Zaharichuk Grayston of Nanoose Bay B.C. for suggesting this winning name.

The thread used for this sample is WonderFil FabuLux 40 weight trilobal polyester, FB39 “Newsprint”.

Click on the WonderFil Affiliate link at the top right to purchase your WonderFil Threads and quilting supplies.

Sunday, 19 September 2021

Julies Quilt Class - New Free Motion Quilting Design #235

Free motion quilting design of loops and berries
New Free Motion Design #235 "Summer Set Garden"

 This playful new Free Motion Quilting design has been named.

There were so many wonderful names that I’m glad I don’t have to choose.

The winner was chosen by popular vote (here and on Facebook / Instagram ) with a little help from a random name picker at 6:00 PM (Pacific) on Sunday Sept 12, 2021.

May I present “Summer Set Garden”.

Thank you and congratulations to Linda Cordonnier (acehay1 on Instagram) for suggesting this winning name.

Linda is from the small town of Russia Ohio. 
How lovely.

The thread used for this sample is WonderFil Polyfast 40 weight trilobal polyester, PF1031 “Deep Passion”.

Classes available, virtual and in person.

Thursday, 2 September 2021

Julies Name Game - New Free Motion Quilting Design #234

New Free Motion Quilting Design of flowers and swirls
New Free Motion Quilting Design #234


 Here for you to name and stitch is this weeks new Free Motion Quilting design.

What do you think it’s name should be?

Comment below to suggest a name or vote for your favorite.

The winner will be chosen by popular vote (here and on Facebook and Instagram )at 6:00 PM (Pacific) on Sunday Sept 5, 2021.

The thread used for this sample is WonderFil FabuLux 40 weight variegated trilobal polyester, FB08 “Ocean Breeze”.

Let the fun begin!

*Attention*

This weeks new Free Motion Quilting design has been named.

This design is now called “Daisy Doodle”.

Congratulations to Philippa Zapf of Nanaimo B.C. on suggestion another winning name.

Click on the links above to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Feedspot.

Wednesday, 25 August 2021

A Great Offer from Make Modern


The front cover of Make Modern Magazine issue 41
Make Modern Issue 41

Have you subscribed to Make Modern yet?

This Australian digital publication began in 2014 and is now enjoyed by thousands of quilters in over seventy countries world wide.

The bi-monthly issues, jam packed with fabulous modern patterns and articles are in PDF format for your computer, tablet or phone.

You can also print the patterns if you wish.

As an affiliate and subscriber (all access) they have allowed me to let you in on a great offer.

 It has been four years since Make Modern magazine raised their subscription prices, and while it's not something they want to do, it has to happen. 

At the end of August, the prices of Make Modern subscriptions and single issues will be increased. 

This is for subscribers signing up from September 2021 only. 

If you have an active Make Modern subscription, your current pricing will remain the same. 

If you have been thinking about subscribing, or planning on gifting a subscription to a friend, now is your chance to take advantage of the current pricing and lock it in for the life of your subscription.

Wow, what a lovely offer!

Purchase your annual subscriptions here:

Make Modern - Six Month Subscription

 Make Modern - Annual Subscription

Make Modern - All Access Subscription


Additional bundles, back issues and patterns may be purchased by clicking on the Make Modern icon at the top left of this page.


Julies Name Game - New Free Motion Quilting Design #233

A free motion quilting design of loops and spikes
New Free Motion Quilting Design #233

 Here is this weeks new Free Motion Quilting design for you.

Large or small this playful design is so “loopy” that it is super quick to stitch.

What do you think it’s name should be?

Comment below to suggest a name or vote for your favorite.

The winner will be chosen by popular vote (here, Facebook and/or Instagram) at 6:00 PM (Pacific) on Sunday Aug. 29, 2021.

The thread used for this sample is WonderFil Tutti,    50 weight variegated cotton, TU30 (Leaves) in both the needle and bobbin.
Click on the WonderFil badge to purchase.

Follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Feedspot.
Links at the top of this page.

Update

This design is now called “Sun Spots”.

It’s name was chosen by popular vote (here, Facebook and Instagram) with a little help from a random name picker.

Thank you and congratulations to Philippa Zapf of Nanaimo B.C. for suggesting this winning name.

Sunday, 22 August 2021

A History of Charm Packs - Free Pattern

 

A collection of fabric Charm Packs containing five inch squares
A Collection of Charm Packs


A charm Pack is a collection of 5” squares containing at least one square from each fabric in a line or grouping.

I absolutely love Charm Packs and have to admit to having a rather large collection of them.                                  

They are pretty, easy to carry (making them a great treat when I’m traveling) and always seem to want to follow me home from the quilt store.

If you are anything like me then you probably have multiple Charm Packs waiting to be sewn so I’ve posted a new Charm Square pattern for you on my Free Pattern Page but first, to understand the origin of the Charm Pack we must look at a brief history of the Charm Quilt.


What is a Charm Quilt?

The accepted definition of a charm quilt is a one patch quilt that uses a different fabric for each patch with no two the same.

Hexagons, Pyramids, Apple Core, Squares,              Half Square Triangles and Tumbler (or Thimble) are just a few of the many traditional One Patch Quilts.

This style of quilting seemed to originate around 1870 and remained popular to around 1900 with a short resurgence in the 1930’s.

As fabric was expensive and not abundantly available during these time periods it is widely considered that quiltmakers of the time would trade pieces of fabric (or beg friends for scraps) in order to have the variety needed to make a charm quilt. This led to these quilts also being referred to as Beggars Quilts.


The Birth of the Modern Charm Square


A co-ordinating group of five inch Charm Squares
A Group of Coordinating Charm Squares

This is where I come in.

With the resurgence of quilting in the 1980’s and 90’s came an abundance of quality quilting fabrics and a renewed interest in making charm quilts.

With the invention of the rotary cutter, we began to strip cut our fabrics making cutting small pieces easier and more accurate.

Quilters began purchasing a little extra every time they bought fabric to cut into squares to trade.    

As the average fabric width was 42” and we didn’t need large pieces for our modern charm quilts it quickly became the norm to cut a five inch strip and divide it into five inch squares.                                        We chose five inches as this was the measurement that gave us a square large enough to be useful with very little leftover at the end of the strip.

A five inch strip of fabric gave us eight squares, one to keep and seven to trade.

Trading five-inch squares was so much fun that Guilds and groups held regular square swaps.                           There was mail in swaps, friendship swaps, birthday swaps and specialty swaps for flower quilts, I Spy quilts, children’s fabric and more.

We were smitten with 5” squares and began to create a wide variety of patterns to use our ever-increasing collections. These patterns often have the addition of sashing, borders and background fabric so they don’t fall under the strict definition of a charm quilt but that’s OK.

Even the antique charm quilts often break the rules.  It’s part of the fun of being a quilter!

We sometimes called these quilts Nickel Quilts referring to another one of the five inch squares nicknames of Nickel Squares.

Over time five inch squares proved to be so popular that some quilt shops began to cut bundles for their customers to purchase.

In 2006 Moda-Fabrics introduced the first mass produced pre-cut bundles at International Quilt Market in the form of 42, 2 ½” strips rolled into what quickly became known as a Jelly Roll.

These bundles contained 42 strips as that was the number of fabrics in the line.                                        As a result, 42 strips in a roll remains the norm.

I’ll share more with you about the 2 ½” strip in a future post.

Other fabric companies quickly followed with strip sets of their own all with fanciful names.

With the popularity of the 2 ½” strip sets and ever improving technology fabric companies quickly added the 5” Charm Pack to their available pre-cut fabrics.

These fabrics are die-cut at the same time as the lines of fabric are printed so it is super simple to make a quilt that appears both scrappy and coordinated at the same time.

They are a great time saver for the busy quilter and offer easy success for those who are learning to quilt.

The number of squares in a charm pack varies with the manufacturer and line of fabric though the average remains 42.


A simple quilt made from five inch charm squares
A Simple Quilt Made of Charm Squares


But Why Are They Called Charm Squares?

The obvious would be that they are all one shape with only one piece of each fabric but there’s more.

Charms or amulets have been worn throughout history and are believed to have magical properties such as the ability to ward off evil or bring good luck.

The charm bracelet as we know it was popularized by Queen Victoria during her reign (1837 – 1901). 

Each charm attached to these bracelets had individual meaning to the wearer and was often the gift of a friend or loved one.

From around 1860 to 1900 young ladies would also trade buttons to make Button Charm Strings.                Buttons were to be gifted or traded (not purchased) as to receive the gift of a button, like most "charms" was considered good luck. 

It seems reasonable to conclude then that quilters of the era found their inspiration in both Charm Bracelets and Button Charm Strings as the first recorded "Charm Quilts" are from the same time period (1870 to 1900).


My Charm Bracelet
My Charm Bracelet

During 1980’s and 1990’s as quilting gained in popularity charm bracelets were once again right there too.


Charms were affordable with hundreds to choose from making them a nice gift to give or receive.                     During this time period Charm Bracelets also became know of as Friendship Bracelets.  

Through the practice of trading our five inch squares they were also known for a short time as friendship squares.

As quilting cotton became more plentiful, making true charm quilts enjoyed another brief resurgence.

When we began purchasing coordinated groups of squares that we could use to make Charm Quilts they just naturally became “Charm Squares”.

Of course, as our collections grew and grew, creative quilters have created an endless variety of patterns to use these once humble Charm Squares.

Now it’s time to go to the Free Pattern Page to get your Free Charming Geese pattern and start sewing!

A lap quilt of triangles made from charm squares
Charming Geese Lap Quilt

Remember to post pictures of the quilts you make from this pattern in the comments section.